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SARAWAK ELECTION SITE

INTRODUCTION

This mini site is a dedicated site to study key issues of Sarawak in preparation for the upcoming state election of 2020/2021. Please respect this principle where this mini site is for academic, NGO, personal and non commercial purposes. Citations are to follow what is written on each section. Each user is to exercise discretion when referring to the data and we are not responsible for any errors and omissions

SARAWAK: OVERVIEW STATE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY (DUN) COMPOSITION

Hover any of the state constituencies in the interactive map below to learn who is your representative, his or her political affiliation and the name of your constituency

For larger view, click here

Compiled by Tindak Malaysia Election Analysis Unit

For Citation: Laporan Kajian Semula Persempadanan mengenai Syor-Syor yang dicadangkan bagi Bahagian – Bahagian Pilihan raya Persekutuan dan Negeri di dalam Negeri Sarawak Kali Keenam 2015 (EC), Free Malaysia Today, Sarawak State Legislative Assembly (DUN) Website, Wikipedia, compiled by Tindak Malaysia (2020)

SECTIONS

  1. Sarawak: Electoral, Administrative and Local Authority Boundaries
  2. Sarawak: Electorate & Total Population
  3. Sarawak: DUN Composition & Political Scene
  4. Sarawak: Deforestation Issue
  5. Sarawak: Water Accessibility
  6. Sarawak: Specific Constituency Stories
  7. (Future Topics)

 

Sarawak: Electoral, Administrative and Local Authority Boundaries

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Sarawak has 12 Divisions (Bahagians) and under each Division, there are two or more districts (Daerah). Under the districts, there are subdistricts (Daerah Kecil)

Sarawak has 26 Local Authority Areas (Pihak Berkuasa Tempatan – PBT). Sarawak is home to one of the three City Halls in Malaysia – Dewan Bandaraya Kuching Utara. In Sarawak, like other parts of Malaysia, there are different types of Local Authorities and they are:

    1. City Hall/City Council (Dewan Bandaraya/ Majlis Bandaraya) – examples: Kuching, Miri
    2. Municipal Council (Majlis Perbandaran) – examples: Padawan
    3. District Council (Majlis Daerah) – example: Kapit
    4. Special Areas (i.e. Lembaga Kemajuan) – example: Bintulu

 

Each type of Local Authority Area comes with different sets of responsibilities and expectations. You can find more here - https://jkt.kpkt.gov.my/node/36

Sarawak has 82 State Legislative Assembly Seats/ State Constituencies (Kawasan Pilihan Raya Dewan Undangan Negeri (DUN)) and 31 parliamentary seats. The boundaries of the 82 state constituencies are enforced since 2015 and can be reviewed from 2023 onwards

A subdistrict is a subset of a district and a district is a subset of Division. However, there are no absolute correspondence of boundaries of land administration (districts) with local authority areas and electoral boundaries. A state constituency could span over multiple districts or be a subset of Local Authority Area. A local authority area can span multiple districts or confined to a small section of a district

We, at Tindak Malaysia, have developed an interactive map application (below) for you to identify your District, Division, Local Authority Area and State Constituency. Alternatively you can click the link here to open in a separate tab. The map was built through a joint effort between Michael Leow and Danesh Prakash Chacko (2020)

Instructions

  1. Click on any part of the map to query the name of the state constituency (DUN), local council area, district and divisional boundaries.
  2. Click on the Layers to turn on and turn off the layers before querying.

For Citation:  Laporan Kajian Semula Persempadanan mengenai Syor-Syor yang dicadangkan bagi Bahagian – Bahagian Pilihan raya Persekutuan dan Negeri di dalam Negeri Sarawak Kali Keenam 2015 (EC), Division Websites, Department of Statistics Malaysia, International Steering Committee for Global Mapping Malaysia. (Jabatan Ukur dan Pemetaan), Local Council Website, Unit Komunikasi Awam Sarawak, compiled by Tindak Malaysia (2020)

 Sarawak: Electorate & Total Population

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Electorate Scene

As Sarawak gears for the next state election, our research concluded that Sarawak has been experiencing a slower growth in electorate size with some constituencies experiencing minor depopulation. Having said that, being an elector (term voter is applicable for polling day) is optional in Malaysia and elector has been given the freedom to update Election Commission of his or her new address. This creates an unquantifiable amount of mismatches between actual electorate who resides in Sarawak and electorate who is on paper resides in Sarawak.

Irrespective of the mismatches, the urgency for Sarawakians to register soon is the highlight of the map application. Click the map application here to learn more on evolving State Constituency Electorate Population of Sarawak since 2015. Follow the Instructions within the application (which is shown on the left hand side)

The map application is built by Tindak Malaysia Election Analysis Unit (2020)

For Citation: Attorney General Chambers, Senarai Harga Daftar Pemilih Induk Tahun 2019 (EC), Laporan Keputusan Akhir Dewan Undangan Negeri bagi Negeri Sarawak Tahun 2016 (EC), Laporan Kajian Semula Persempadanan mengenai Syor-Syor yang dicadangkan bagi Bahagian – Bahagian Pilihan raya Persekutuan dan Negeri di dalam Negeri Sarawak Kali Keenam 2015 (EC), PKR, Compiled by Tindak Malaysia Election Analysis Unit

Evolution of Sarawak DUN Electorate Population

The image above shows the content of the application when you open the link

Population Scene

Sarawak’s population has grown 1.7 times since 1991 and currently has a population estimate of  2,828,900 (2018) according to Department of Statistics (DOSM). In the 2018 estimate, 55% of Sarawakian population resided in districts of Kuching, Bintulu, Miri and Sibu (which are home to the four main cities that share the same names with their parent districts). This is an increase of 7% in concentration since 1991

The top three districts that experiencing in multiplication of population were:

  1. Samarahan  – Grown by 3 times since 1991
  2. Bintulu – Grown by 2.5 times since 1991
  3. Miri – Grown by 2.2 times since 1991

 

While the population has grown strongly in the more urbanized districts, Sarawak has been experiencing a severe malapportionment among state constituencies which disadvantage urbanites. The map below shows the implication of redelineation (then) proposals of 2015 which grossly reduced voter value for Sarawakians who reside in urban areas. In 2018, approximately 58% of the Sarawakians reside in urban areas (refer here)

The map below shows the evolution of population growth of the districts of Sarawak since 1991.

Instructions

  1. Click the map below for larger view
  2. You are taken to the full view of the map. Click on the image for larger view
  3. Click again to minimize view
  4. Click the back button to return to main menu
  5. Please read the statement below the population map on Sarawak Election Site to understand the reasons of missing data

Map was compiled by Tindak Malaysia Election Analysis Unit (2020)

For Citation:  Department of Statistics of Malaysia (DOSM), Data.Gov.my, International Steering Committee for Global Mapping (Malaysia. Jabatan Ukur dan Pemetaan), Majlis Daerah Betong, Majlis Daerah Sibuti, Majlis Perbandaran Padawan, Unit Komunikasi Awam Sarawak, compiled by Tindak Malaysia (2020)

Any modification (parts or whole) of the map below for non Tindak purposes requires a written permission which can be directed via info@tindakmalaysia.com

Sarawak_for_Website_Population_1991_2018-page-001

* Tebedu was once part of Serian District, Pusa was part of Betong District, Kabong was part of Saratok District, Tanjung Manis was part of Daro District, Sebauh was part of Bintulu District, Bukit Mabong was part of Kapit District, Beluru and Telang Usan Districts were part of Marudi District

SARAWAK: DUN COMPOSITION & POLITICAL SCENE

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Sarawak DUN Scene from 2006 – 2016

From Tindak Malaysia’s analysis of three election cycles at the DUN level and recorded incidents of electoral abuses, the following seats should be closely monitored:

  1. Tasik Biru
  2. Kota Sentosa
  3. Batu Kitang
  4. Batu Kawah
  5. Repok
  6. Dudong
  7. Bawang Assan
  8. Pelawan
  9. Piasau
  10. Pujut
  11. Senadin
  12. Telang Usan
  13. Ba’kelalan

The map below shows a general overview of evolving electoral scene of Sarawak from 2006 to 2016. Over the years, chief ministers of Sarawak have been changed, new political alliances were born, the opposition parties such as DAP and PKR experienced some inroads (and setbacks too) and 2015 redelineation exercise witnessed the addition of 11 new state constituencies.

Instructions

  1. Click the map below for larger view
  2. You are taken to full view of the map. Click on the image for larger view
  3. Click again to minimize view
  4. Click the back button to return to main menu

The map product is jointly built by Danesh Prakash Chacko and Keng Hooi Teoh.

For Citation: EC Malaysia, Wikipedia, compiled by Tindak Malaysia (2020)

Any modification (parts or whole) of the map below for non Tindak purposes requires a written permission which can be directed via info@tindakmalaysia.com

Sarawak 2006 - 2016 Political Scene

WORK IN PROGRESS

SARAWAK: DEFORESTATION ISSUE

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WORK IN PROGRESS

While the majority of Sarawak’s area is under forest cover (2018), industrial plantations (i.e. oil palm) have been principal drivers of deforestation in Sarawak for the past four decades (refer here). In 2018, Sarawak has 6.3 million hectares of forest area which is slightly over 50% of the state.  From 2000 to 2018, Sarawak has lost nearly 1.8 million hectares of forest area where nearly 50% of the loss was attributed to oil palm plantation expansion. Bulk of the forest loss largely occurred before the year of 2010. Some of the consequences of deforestation and logging are increasing number of flood events, loss of access to traditional food and clean water and destruction of sources of income (refer here)

Having said that, forest losses from 2015 has substantially reduced and more so, the growth of industrial oil palm and pulpwood plantations have slowed down. One of the primary factors which contributed to the slowing of oil palm plantation growth is due to the decline of crude palm oil prices (refer here). Moreover, one must also attribute to the efforts of the government, private sector (i.e. banks) and civil society keeping a lid on the growth of these plantations.

This section briefly looks at key figures of Sarawak Deforestation Scene.

Click on Brief Story of Sarawak’s Deforestation Scene link here to obtain a quick overview of the issue. This application is built by Danesh Prakash Chacko with the advise of Keng Hooi Teoh (2020)

Instructions

  1. Once you click the link, it will open in a separate tab
  2. On the topmost part of the application (Key Facts), you will see three section – Opening Page, Overview of Land Use and Deforestation, Key Facts. Click on any of these options to view dedicated dashboards
  3. For dedicated dashboard section, hover over the area, bar and line charts to see the values at different intervals of time

For Citation for Key Facts: Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), https://atlas.cifor.org/, EC Malaysia, compiled by Tindak Malaysia (2020)

Sarawak_for_Website_Deforestation

The image above shows the content of the application when you open the link

SARAWAK: WATER ACCESSIBILITY

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WORK IN PROGRESS

One of the key features that appear in Sarawak state elections is the distribution of water tanks in rural areas. This begs a question on why water tanks are still being distributed to rural areas as opposed to serious investing in regular and stable water supply. The 2020 National Budget under then PH government allocated RM470 million for rural water supply connectivity for Sabah and Sarawak (refer here). However, the Sarawakian state government believes this allocation is below to the expected expense (of RM 3 billion) to enable full rural water supply for Sarawak. Sarawak’s government estimated such allocation will only increase the coverage of water supply by a miniscule number (0.3%). To delve further on this issue, this section is dedicated to highlight all the readers on how access to water across Sarawak has evolved over time

Quick Facts

  1. Access to piped water in a house has increased from 80.8% (2012) to 86.4% (2019) of households in Sarawak
  2. Access to piped water in a house for urban area has been consistently around 98 – 99.4% (2012 – 2019) of households in Sarawak
  3. Access to piped water in a house for rural areas has grown from 57.4% (2012) to 69.8 % (2019) of households in Sarawak
  4. Around 42% of Sarawak’s population reside in rural areas in 2018
  5. The top State Constituencies receiving water tanks in 2016 were Opar (1500) and Tanjung Datu (1500). Both are largely located in Lundu District where 45.2% of the households received piped water access at home (2016)

The map below shows a quick comparison in growth of access to piped water for households in Sarawak by administrative districts

Instructions

  1. Click the map below for larger view
  2. You are taken to full view of the map. Click on the image for larger view
  3. Click again to minimize view
  4. Click the back button to return to main menu

Map compiled by Tindak Malaysia Election Analysis Unit (2020)

For Citation: Department of Statistics of Malaysia, International Steering Committee for Global Mapping (Malaysia. Jabatan Ukur dan Pemetaan), Jabatan Ukur dan Pemetaan, Tindak Malaysia (2020)

Any modification (parts or whole) of the map below for non Tindak purposes requires a written permission which can be directed via info@tindakmalaysia.com

Sarawak_for_Website_Access_to_Piped Water-page-001

SARAWAK: CONSTITUENCY SPECIFIC STORIES

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This section is dedicated to specific stories and analysis for certain constituencies. Click on the text below to study in depth stories for various constituencies. Citations are to follow the specifications mentioned in the website

1. Population Scene in Miri

 

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